Valentine’s Day Glitter Bottles!

Glitter bottles are awesome. Not only are they beautiful, but can be a great tool for kids to use when they are feeling upset. Here are some reasons why:

a. The simple act of shaking them provides the action of heavy work, which, in and of itself, tends to have a calming effect on the body.

b. Having your child watch the glitter start at the top of the bottle, swirl around, and settle to the bottom, can be representative of their inner emotions that feel too big for their bodies at the time.

c. Glitter bottles can be a great visual tool if your child becomes over-stimulated by visuals in his or her environment.

d. Glitter bottles can act as a timer, and/or as a transition tool for difficult parts of the day.

Knowing how versatile glitter bottles are, I decided to go “glitter-jar-wild” for Valentine’s Day, both with my own kids and the children whom I treat clinically.

To make this super-simple, I will just show you the steps with a picture and a few words, as needed:

Fill a plastic water bottle 1/3 of the way full. Add 1-2 squirts of glitter glue into the bottle (to make this festive, we used a mix of pink and orange). Shake vigorously with 2 hands until the glitter glue is dissolved and you do not see any more clumps. This portion of the activity is great for bilateral upper extremity strengthening, and postural control/stability.
Fill a plastic water bottle 1/3 of the way with water. Add 1-2 squirts of glitter glue into the bottle (to make this festive, we used a mix of pink and orange).
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Vigorously shake the glitter glue and water, with 2 hands on the bottle at all times, until no clumps are visible. By using both hands, this portion of the activity works on bilateral upper extremity coordination, and overall postural strength/control.
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Add glitter! Thicker pieces fall down to the bottom more quickly, finer pieces more slowly. In keeping with this holiday theme, we chose pinks, reds, purples, silvers, and golds. This part of the activity requires body control, visual attention, and hand stability (note: all portions can easily be modified for children who require assistance in specific areas; i.e- I held the bottle for a few of children due to difficulty with this  component).
Fill up the bottle with water. Close tightly and shake. Unscrew the cap, and seal the top with crazy glue ( I would do this part yourself!) do not shake it until the glue dries, so the glue does not drip into the bottle.
Seal the top with crazy glue ( I would do this part yourself!) Do not shake it until the glue dries, so the glue does not drip into the bottle.

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